MACC-CPME-E                                                                                                                                    21 December 1998

SUBJECT: Information Paper on Character Development at West Point

 

 

1. The mission of the United States Military Academy is to educate, train and inspire the Corps of Cadets so that each graduate is a commissioned leader of character committed to the values of Duty, Honor, Country; professional growth throughout a career as an officer in the United States Army; and a lifetime of service to the Nation.

 

2. The Academy defines a leader of character as someone who seeks to discover truth, seeks to gain an understanding of what is right, and then demonstrates the courage and commitment to act accordingly. Character is manifest in conduct, reflecting intellect, will, compassion and the warrior spirit.

 

3. The Academy's leadership recognizes that the processes which affect character development are numerous and varied; not all of which can be controlled or even accounted for. We are, therefore, careful to avoid centralizing "character development" within any particular organization at West Point; rather, we design the entire West Point experience (those elements we control) to contribute to moral-ethical development in cadets. We use the phrase "character development across the curriculum" to describe this approach. Each of the three major Programs (Academic, Military and Physical) has articulated moral-ethical development as a Program goal, and strives to achieve these goals through formal curriculums and programs. Examples include the Honor System, Respect education curriculum (human relations training), the core philosophy course (graded ethics course based primarily on the just war tradition), the core leadership course, the core military art course, the core constitutional law course, the military evaluation system (each cadet is rated on his/her adherence to the value ideology of the Army), and the athletic sportsmanship grading system. Due to the wide range of contributions to character development across the curriculum, the Academy has created a coordinating agency under the Office of the Commandant, the Center for the Professional Military Ethic (CPME). The CPME, in conjunction with the Honor and Respect Committees, is also responsible for the non-graded values education curriculum within the Military Program, which currently consists of separate Honor education and Respect education curriculums. Starting in academic year 1999-2000, the CPME will implement a single curriculum based on the current Honor and Respect lesson plans.

 

4. Informal processes also contribute to character development across the curriculum. We influence these processes through command emphasis since they are arguably more effective than the formal curriculums and programs mentioned above. Examples include the cadet sponsorship program, classroom discussions, athletic team activities and staff & faculty role modeling. These processes are obviously beyond our ability to account for or measure, but we continually emphasize them with great respect for the significant opportunities they afford us. The overall process of character development, therefore, is the result of formal, institutional programs and the result of informal, interpersonal interaction.

 

5. The most salient formal program, and the one that is most relevant to the purposes of JSCOPE, is the Honor System. The Honor System is comprised of two supporting components.

 

a. The first component is the Cadet Honor Code. The Honor Code fosters an atmosphere of trust and serves as a fundamental means to reinforce ethical behavior. It is a simple code with clearly defined standards of conduct; accordingly, it serves as a building block for moral-ethical development. Annex A to this memorandum provides a basic description of the Cadet Honor Code.

 

b. The second is the Honor Education Curriculum, which consists of 47 non-graded hours of developmental education over four years. Honor Education occurs during the academic year, Cadet Basic Training, and Cadet Field Training (summer after the sophomore year). These lessons provide the broad based, conceptual framework that gives each cadet a basic understanding of the Cadet Honor Code, ethical decision making, the Army Values and the Professional Military Ethic.

 

6. The goals of the Honor Education Curriculum are listed in Annex B; they can be summarized into one simple concept: personal identification with the Professional Military Ethic. Achieving that goal, of course, is not so simple. To encourage personal identification with the Professional Military Ethic, cadets must reflect upon their own values, identify personal values which are dysfunctional or antithetical to the espoused values of the Professional Military Ethic, evaluate how such dysfunctional values affect ethical decision making, and experiment with the application of the espoused values in personal ethical decision making. Traditional teaching outcomes are generally limited to imparting knowledge; therefore, non-traditional teaching techniques are appropriate when trying to affect change in the manner we are discussing.

 

7. Accordingly, Honor Education at West Point is an atypical curriculum. Approximately 25% of the classes involve traditional instruction wherein an instructor is expected to impart knowledge and the "students" are expected to learn and retain knowledge. Traditional instruction primarily covers these subjects: the West Point Honor Code, ethical dilemma problem solving techniques, the Army Values, professions and professional ethics. With the exception of the Honor Code, these subjects will have already been introduced to the cadets in their core academic courses by the time we address them in the Honor Education Curriculum. The remainder of the classes are reflective, small group discussions about hypothetical and actual experiences that force the decision maker to choose between two options that both have morally regrettable consequences (ethical dilemmas). Through discussion of ethical dilemmas cadets will reflect upon the ethical reasoning processes employed by others and themselves, and will consequently examine their own values and beliefs. The staff and faculty volunteers (described below) assist cadets in the process of reaching conclusions about their own values and beliefs. The content of the dilemmas progresses from the West Point environment to the Army environment in tandem with the progression of the cadetsí education on the USMA Values, the Army Values and the Professional Military Ethic.

 

8. Most of the instruction and small group facilitation is done by cadets. We strongly believe that peer leaders, not authority figures, will establish, maintain and alter the values actually adhered to and internalized by the Corps of Cadets. Since cadets, however, have little experience in teaching and facilitating, classes are prepared, rehearsed and conducted under the mentorship of staff & faculty members who have habitual and established relationships with specific companies in the Corps. We call these groups Company Honor Education Teams (CHETs). CHETs have the following members: 4 volunteer staff and faculty members, the company tactical officer and NCO, the cadet company commander, and both company honor representatives. Officer, civilian and NCO CHET members do teach some classes. These are predominantly classes to the seniors on the Professional Military Ethic.

 

9. The Professional Military Ethic is, admittedly, ill-defined. No inter-service document adequately addresses the subject, and in absence of such, we have endeavored to define the Professional Military Ethic for cadets relying on the collective wisdom of research in the field of American Military Professionalism. We define the Professional Military Ethic as: the military professionís standards for personal and corporate character, competencies and conduct requisite in the defense of the U.S. Constitution. Through a series of honor classes, cadets in their senior year describe the three basic components of the ethic in greater detail. These classes synthesize the lessons cadets have learned about their chosen profession across the broad spectrum of the West Point developmental experience.

 

10. More detail about the specific content of the Honor Education lessons can be found in Annex C. The point of contact for this document is the undersigned, (914) 938-3028; DSN: 688-3038.

 

 

 


Annex A, The West Point Honor System 24 Oct 1998

 
SUBJECT: Information Paper on the Honor Code

 

1. Introduction. Why have an honor code?

 

a. In professions such as the military where life is endangered by virtue of the professionís purpose, trust becomes sacred and integrity becomes a requisite quality for each professional. An officer who is not trustworthy cannot be tolerated. In some professions the cost of dishonesty is measured in dollars Ė in the Army, the cost is measured in human lives. The ability of West Point to educate, train and inspire outstanding leaders of character for our Army is predicated upon the functional necessity of honesty in its members. In short, USMA expects its graduates and cadets to commit to a lifetime of honorable living; successful defense of our nation relies upon that.

 

b. In order to foster a genuine commitment to honorable living, USMA maintains Honor as a bedrock value. This value is operationalized through the Cadet Honor Code, the Honor Investigative and Hearing System, and the Honor Education System. Although the Honor Code & System "belongs" to West Point graduates, staff and faculty members, and cadets, the special charter of maintaining the Honor Code & System resides with the Corps of Cadets. Since 1922, the elected members of the Cadet Honor Committee have represented the Corps on all matters pertaining to honor and are the stewards of the Code.

 

2. The Cadet Honor Code.

 

a. The Cadet Honor Code is defined in USCC Pam 632-1, The Cadet Honor Code and System as, "A cadet will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do." The Honor Code expresses four succinct prohibitions. On a behavioral level, the Code represents a simple standard for all cadets. On a developmental plane, West Point expects that all cadets will strive to live far above the minimum standard of behavior and develop a commitment to ethical principles guiding moral actions.

 

b. West Pointís core mission is develop leaders of character for our Army. A leader

of character knows what is right, and possesses the moral courage to act on that knowledge. The principles of truthfulness, fairness, respect for others, and professional responsibility constitute that fundamental ideal known as the spirit of the Code. A leader of character will apply the Spirit of the Code when making decisions involving ethical dilemmas.

 

3. The Investigative and Hearing System.

 

a. The Corps of Cadets bears the responsibility to resolve all possible violations of

the Code through detailed, independent investigations and, when required, Honor Investigative Hearings. If a cadet (or anyone else) suspects that a violation occurred, then (s)he is expected to approach the individual to clarify what happened (this step is optional). If that approach resolves the issue; i.e., the cadet making the allegation realizes no Honor violation occurred, then the issue will be dropped. However, if the person making the allegation still believes a violation may have occurred, (s)he is obligated to inform a member of the Honor Committee within 24 hours. Failure to do so is considered "toleration," which is itself a violation of the Honor Code (the 24 hour rule is a guideline, cadets are not automatically in violation of the Code if they take more than 24 hours to report a violation). Once a suspected violation is reported to a member of the Honor Committee, it must be investigated. The two Honor Committee members from the suspected cadetís company will do an initial inquiry and make a recommendation; then two members from outside the company will perform an investigation and make a recommendation; then the Regimental Honor Representative will review the case file and make a recommendation to the Vice-Chairperson for Investigations (VCI). The VCI is the first person who has the authority to drop the case. If this decision (either forward or drop) is not in agreement with every other recommendation in the case file, then the Chairperson must make the final decision. If the case is forwarded to a hearing, the Commandant of Cadets must approve the decision and order that a hearing be convened.

 

b. A panel of nine randomly selected cadets (4 honor committee members and 5

from the Corps at large) determines whether or not one of their peers violated the Honor Code. Six of the nine voting members must determine that it is more likely than not that the cadet in question intentionally violated the Code. The respondent is afforded legal counsel and has the right to remain silent throughout out the investigation, to include the hearing. There is no prosecution or defense; both the hearing members and the respondent do all of the questioning. Witnesses are selected by the VCI and the respondent. The hearing is presided over by a Cadet Present with the Assistance of a Hearing Officer, who is a JAG officer (military lawyer). The Hearing Officer is not allowed to vote, but does rule on procedural matters.

 

c. If the members of the Honor Investigative hearing determine that a cadet violated

the Code, then they provide input to the Superintendent for disposition of the case. The Superintendent is bound by a "not found" verdict, but he may overturn a "found" decision based upon a legal review of the procedures. The Superintendent may exercise "discretion" and retain the cadet, or he may recommend separation to the Secretary of the Army. The Secretary of the Army is the sole separation authority for a cadet found in violation of the Honor Code at the United States Military Academy.

 

4. The Honor Committee. During the sophomore (yearling) year, each cadet company

(there are 32 companies of approximately 120 cadets each) will elect a company honor representative (CHR) who will serve as an active member of the Honor Committee during her or his junior (cow) and senior (firstie) years. Therefore, the honor committee has 64 active CHRs. During the cow year, these 64 members elect their own committee leadership who will serve during the upcoming firstie year. The positions include the Chairperson of the Honor Committee, six staff officers, and four RHRs (one per regiment). The Chairperson works directly with the Commandant and Superintendent and is viewed by those officers to represent the Corps on all matters pertaining to Honor. The staff officer functions include investigations, hearings, the education program, liaisons with the academic departments, and honor/ethics conferences.

 


Annex B, Honor Education Goals

 
Honor Education Goals and Objectives

 

Cadets who complete the Cadet Basic Training Honor Education sequence should:

 

1. Know the behavioral standards of conduct prescribed by the Cadet Honor Code.

a. Know the tenets of the Cadet Honor Code.

 

b. Know the "three rules of thumb."

 

c. Be familiar with key definitions used in conjunction with Honor.

 

d. Be familiar with the honor case process from allegation to final disposition.

 

e. Be familiar with circumstances that most frequently jeopardize cadet adherence to the Honor Code.

 

f. Be familiar with how the Honor Code applies to all aspects of cadet life: academic, military, athletic, and social environments.

 

2. Know that the four prohibitions of the Honor Code are a minimum standard of ethical behavior during cadet years.

 

a. Recognize the importance of a commitment to honorable living as a cadet at the United States Military Academy.

 

b. Recognize the importance of not tolerating Honor Code violations.

 

Cadets who complete the Fourth Class Honor Education sequence should:

 

1. Understand the Cadet Honor Code & System at the United States Military Academy.

 

a. Define key terms used in conjunction with Honor.

 

b. Explain the honor process from allegation to final disposition.

 

c. Know the circumstances that most frequently jeopardize cadet adherence to the Honor Code.

 

d. Know how the Honor Code applies to all aspects of cadet life: academic, military, athletic, and social environments.

 

e. Recognize the features that ensure fairness in the policies and operating procedures of the Honor Code & System.

 

2. Understand the relationship between the Honor Code & System and the Spirit of the Honor Code.

 

a. Understand that honorable living is a different and higher standard than merely adhering to the Cadet Honor Code.

 

b. Explain the importance of not tolerating Honor Code violations.

 

c. Be familiar with what is meant by the Spirit of the Honor Code.

 

 

 

 

Cadets who complete the Cadet Field Training Honor Education sequence should:

 

1. Know how to apply honorable living to the field and combat environments.

 

a. Know that the US Army is required to abide by the Law of War as established by treaties, conventions and customary practices.

 

b. Know the three basic principles of the Law of War that govern a soldierís conduct (unnecessary suffering, military necessity, proportionality).

 

c. Be familiar with some of the circumstances that may challenge oneís integrity in the field environment.

 

2. Be prepared to lead in the ethical development of subordinates as cadet team leaders.

 

a. Know that subordinate character development is a leader responsibility.

 

b. Be familiar with how a leader can influence character development in subordinates.

 

Cadets who complete the Third Class Honor Education sequence should:

 

1. Know how to apply reasoning and ethical principles when resolving problems and making decisions.

 

a. Define an ethical dilemma.

 

b. Articulate a logical solution to hypothetical ethical dilemmas.

 

2. Understand the Spirit of the Honor Code and its relationship to the Army Values.

 

a. Define the Spirit of the Honor Code.

 

b. Understand the criteria by which honorable decisions and actions are made.

 

c. Explain the importance of not tolerating dishonorable conduct.

 

d. Understand the interdependent relationship between Honor and leadership.

e. Be familiar with the Army Values.

 

3. Be prepared to lead in the ethical development of subordinates as cadet NCOs.

 

 

Cadets who complete the Second Class Honor Education sequence should:

 

1. Understand the Army Values and their relationship to the Professional Military Ethic.

 

a. Explain how functional requirements of warfare shape the Army Values.

 

b. Know the Army Values.

 

c. Define key terms used in conjunction with the Army Values.

 

d. Be familiar with some of the circumstances that frequently jeopardize officer adherence to the Army Values.

 

e. Explain the importance of not tolerating unethical conduct.

 

f. Understand the interdependent relationship between ethics and leadership.

 

g. Be familiar with the Professional Military Ethic.

 

3. Be prepared to lead in the ethical development of subordinates as cadet officers.

 

Cadets who complete the First Class Honor Education sequence should:

 

1. Understand the American Professional Military Ethic.

 

a. Know the Professional Ethic as articulated in FM 100-1 and FM 22-100.

 

b. Define key terms used in conjunction with the Professional Ethic.

 

c. Know how the Army meets the three criteria of a profession: expertise, responsibility, and corporateness.

 

d. Articulate the critical relationship between an officerís obligation to be intolerant of ethical misconduct and the professionís corporate obligation to be self-regulating.

 

e. Understand the interdependent relationship between professionalism and leadership.

 

2. Know how to establish an ethical command climate in a military organization.

 

a. Know how to assess and evaluate the condition of a unitís ethical command climate.

 

b. Understand the direct relationship between the example an officer sets and the standards he/she enforces (LDRSHIP), and the unitís ethical command climate.

 

c. Know how a leader develops character in subordinates.

 

3. Be prepared to resolve ethical dilemmas as a junior officer in the US Army.

 

a. Be familiar with some of the ethical dilemmas commonly faced by junior Army officers.

 

b. Be able to integrate reasoning, ethical dilemma analysis skills, and the values inherent in the Professional Military Ethic when making decisions.

 

4. Be prepared to lead in the ethical development of subordinates as junior officers.

 

 

Annex C, Honor Lesson Plan Summaries by year group

 

Cadet Basic Training
 

H1: Army Values (Superintendent Lecture): Within 48 hours of their arrival, the new cadets meet the Superintendent in this forum. The Superintendent personally explains to them why the Army Values, in particular the fundamental values of Honor and Respect, are fundamental qualities for commissioned leaders of character in the US Army.

 

H2: Truthfulness: Introduces the new cadet to the first tenet of the Honor Code, and highlights the meaning and significance of the term "lying" as a cadet at West Point. This class also emphasizes the importance of honesty in the West Point environment and the notion of honesty in the context of the Professional Military Ethic.

 

H3: Fairness: Introduces the new cadets to the second tenet of the Honor Code, and highlights the meaning and significance of the term "cheating" at West Point. This class emphasizes the importance of fairness in the West Point environment and the notion of fairness in the context of Professional Military Ethic.

 

H4: Respect for others: Introduces the new cadets to the third tenet of the Honor Code, and highlights the meaning and significance of the term "stealing" at West Point. This class emphasizes the importance of respect in the West Point environment and the notion of respect in the context of the Professional Military Ethic.

 

H5: Responsibility (1.5 hours): Introduces the new cadets to the fourth tenet of the Honor Code, and highlights the meaning and significance of the term "non-toleration" at West Point. This class emphasizes the importance of non-toleration in the West Point environment and the notion of corporate responsibility and self-regulation in the context of the Professional Military Ethic.

 

H6: Commitment to Honorable Living (guest lecture): Inspires personal commitment to the tenets of the Cadet Honor Code and begins the process of internalizing and committing these core values to one's lifestyle at the Academy and beyond.

 

H7: The Honor System at West Point (1.5 hours): Explains the processes by which cadets enforce the Honor Code among themselves and explains why the Honor System is important to cadets. This includes discussions of the Honor Committee and the company honor representative, approach for clarification of the suspected honor violation, the conduct of honor investigations, the conduct of hearings, and the review process subsequent to hearings.

 

H8: The Spirit of the Code, Professionalism and the Professional Military Ethic: Introduces the new cadets to the spirit of the Honor Code. This class emphasizes the importance of the higher standards of the Honor Code in terms of integrity and honorable living. This class also illustrates the linkages between the Cadet Honor Code and the Professional Military Ethic.

 

H9: Why have an Honor Code? (Honor Committee presentation): Explains the purpose of the Honor Code to the new cadets by emphasizing the necessary values of commissioned officers. The class also summarizes the information taught to the new cadets throughout the CBT honor classes.

 

 

 

FOURTH CLASS YEAR

 

4-1: Applications of Honorable living in Cadet Life--The Company: Illustrates applications of the principles of the Cadet Honor Code and the Spirit of the Code in the lives of cadets within the cadet company. It covers such topics as drill roles, departure books, absentee reports, held reports and personal accountability.

 

4-2: Honorable Living in Cadet Life - Academics: Illustrates applications of the principles of the Cadet Honor Code and the Spirit of the Code in the lives of cadets as students and scholars. It covers such topics as documentation of the words and ideas of others, and acknowledging assistance of others in the preparation of academic work. The Dean of the Academic Board presents his views concerning the importance of honorable living in a cadet's academic life through a short videotape, aired at the beginning of this class.

 

4-3: Honor Investigative System and Process: Company Honor Representative thoroughly review the material taught in CBT (often forgotten due to the stresses of "Beast Barracks") on the Honor investigative process. This class emphasizes that the Honor System at USMA is a means of protecting the rights of cadets through due process considerations under the law.

 

4-4: Applications of Honorable Living in Cadet Life--The Athletic Fields: Illustrates applications of the principles of the Cadet Honor Code and the Spirit of the Code in the lives of cadet athletes on the fields of friendly strife - that sportsmanship, fair play, and honoring the rules are inherent to honorable victory. The Director of Intercollegiate Athletics presents her views of the importance of honorable living on the fields of friendly strife through a short videotape, aired at the beginning of the class.

 

4-5: Mock Honor Investigative Hearing: The Fourth Class cadets hold a mock honor investigative hearing. This serves to reduce fear of "the system." The cadets will see the multiple checks that the system has in order to ensure fairness for the respondent. The cadets should place faith in the Honor Systemís ability to fairly come to a finding concerning a cadetís actions.

 

4-6: Concerns of Living Under the Cadet Honor Code: This open-ended forum provides cadets the opportunity to discuss in small groups their concerns about the Cadet Honor Code. It concludes with a focused discussion of the Spirit of the Code. Each company prepares an after action review.

 
Cadet Field Training
 

H1: Field Honor. The purpose of H1 is to acknowledge and specifically address the application of the Honor Code in the field-training environment. The field environment places cadets in situations which are, for the most part, unfamiliar. Preparing the cadets for the possible dilemmas they may face (based on past experience) sets them up for success.

 

H2: The Law of Land Warfare, part I. The purpose of H-2 is to familiarize cadets with the Law of War and to prepare them for some of the ethical concepts that they may need to apply before "Viking Thrust," which is a 10-day, combat operation. In addition, the instruction serves as a vehicle to assist the cadet in exploring his or her own personal honor and challenges to integrity within the larger context of the Army. This class serves only as a basic introduction to the Law of War and moral philosophy, which will be reinforced and taught in the core philosophy and law courses.

 

H3: The Law of Land Warfare, part II. This class reinforces the lessons learned in H2 by allowing the cadets to examine case studies, drawn from actual small-unit combat experiences. The focus of these case studies are on the three basic principles of the laws of war: unnecessary suffering, military necessity, and proportionality.

 

H4: Leaders of Honor. This class addresses the individual leaderís responsibility to contribute to the moral-ethical development of his or her subordinate. In small groups, cadets discuss their upcoming roles during the academic year as team leaders and begin developing a plan for ethical leadership and subordinate development.

 
THIRD CLASS YEAR

 

 

3-1: Documentation and Intellectual Property: This class provides an opportunity for the cadets to review the Documentation of Written Work published by the Office of the Dean, issues of general academic integrity and copyright laws. The cadets will also briefly review the basics of the Honor Code and supporting system.

 

3-2: Non-toleration as a Defining Element of Professionalism: This class is intended to make the Third Class aware of the relationships among the Cadet Honor Code, the Army Values and the Professional Military Ethic. In particular, they will discuss the necessity of upholding and enforcing ethical standards within the Military Profession and the relationship between their behaviors as cadets and their future behaviors as commissioned officers.

 

3-3: Duties and Responsibilities of the Company Honor Representative and the election of the Company Honor Representative: An active Company Honor Representative presents the duties and responsibilities of the "honor rep" and facilitates a discussion of the importance of selecting solid leaders to serve as a company honor representative. The results of this election are announced during this session.

 

3-4: Address by the Executive Staff: In this lesson, the honor committee executive staff will give a presentation that increases the Third Class cadetsí awareness of and understanding of the relationship of "honor" to their chosen profession.

 

3-5: Introduction to the Ethical Dilemma: This lesson introduces cadets to the notion of the ethical dilemma. It provides cadets an opportunity to practice principled reasoning and logic skills in discussion of meaningful dilemmas.

 

3-6: Dilemma Assignment/Analysis Period: This period is given to cadets for the purpose of analyzing a dilemma and developing courses of action based on what was learned in 3-5. The cadets will do this in small self-run groups. They will prepare a presentation to be given in 3-7.

 

3-7: Dilemma Project Presentations: During this period, cadets will give group presentations explaining the results of their dilemma analysis. They are tasked to connect their findings with the goals of the Honor Code.

 

3-8: Concerns of Living Under the Code: This is a period of reflection for the Third Class cadets. They should all articulate the importance of honor to them at USMA and link that to the Army Values. It also serves as a feedback mechanism; after action reviews are created and turned in to the Cadet Honor Committee executive staff and the CPME staff.

 

 

 
 

 

SECOND CLASS YEAR

 

 

2-1: Welcome to the Profession of Arms: This lesson provides the CHET with an opportunity to welcome the Second Class cadets to the Profession of Arms. This time also serves as an introduction to the Army Values, the core concept of ethics for Army officers. The lesson then transitions into a brief refresher on the purpose and mechanics of the Cadet Honor System.

 

2-2: Army Values, Part One: This lesson provides the Second Class with an understanding of Loyalty, Duty, Respect, and Personal Courage, and their contribution to the Army values. Cadets discuss the definitions of the values in practical terms, and view short video clips which demonstrate those values in action.

 

2-3: Army Values, Part Two: To provide the Second Class with an understanding of Honor, Integrity, and Selfless Service, and their contribution to the Army Values. Cadets discuss the definitions of the values in practical terms, and view short video clips which demonstrate those values in action.

 

2-4: Applications of the Army Values -- Leaders of Character: In this lesson, video clips from prominent Army leaders are used to reinforce the importance of the Seven Army Values (LDRSHIP).

 

2-5: Leadership in Combat Ė The Crucible of Army Values: This period is intended to demonstrate the absolute necessity of ethical and moral officers on the battlefield. The readings from the Honor Reading Packet provide compelling evidence of the effect such values have when possessed by leaders in combat.

 

2-6: Leadership and Ethics: During this period of instruction, cadets will view segments of a speech given by Gus Lee at the National Conference for Ethics in America. This video underscores the necessity of leading ethically and morally as told from the unique standpoint of a civilian.

 

2-7: Non-Toleration of Unethical Conduct: In this lesson, cadets are exposed to the defining element of professionalism in the American Armed Forcesónon-toleration of unethical conduct. This class also attempts to heighten cadet awareness of perhaps the most serious criticism of the militaryís claim to be a profession, namely "cover-ups" of unethical conduct. The class then attempts to balance that criticism with actual examples of the militaryís "self policing" function. Finally, this class demonstrates the link between the fourth tenet of the Honor Code and the Professional Military Ethic.

 

2-8: The Army Values Capstone Lecture: This lecture, delivered by a senior Army officer, will emphasize the importance of the Army Values to the functioning of the Profession of Arms.

 

2-9: Living With the Cadet Honor Code: In an open-ended forum, this lesson provides cadets an opportunity to discuss their concerns about the difficulties they have experienced living with the Cadet Honor Code. Concludes with a focused discussion of the Spirit of the Honor Code. Each company informally prepares an after action review of the discussion that can subsequently be used to revise and improve the Honor Education Program.

 

FIRST CLASS YEAR

 

1-1: Establishing the Moral and Ethical Climate in the Army: This class is designed to be taught to companies, rather than to only the First Class cadets. It is prepared and conducted by the First Class cadets, so the development and learning actually focuses on that class. However, all classes will learn through this process. In addition, the class has a practical purpose: it allows the company leadership to establish the conditions of the command climate they intend to create during the upcoming year. The Professional Military Ethic is founded on a positive command climate; this class helps the First Class cadets transition to the culminating year of Honor Education.

 

1-2: Contemporary Movie: This class provides an opportunity to view a modern film which illustrates the importance of the ethical climate in military organizations and what occurs when commanders at various levels fail to maintain a healthy ethical climate within their commands.

 

1-3: Contemporary Movie -Discussion: This class provides CHETs with an opportunity to discuss the film they watched in the previous lesson. This discussion should focus on analyzing the struggles with ethics and leadership of the main characters.

 

1-4: Ethical Challenges for the Junior Officer: This class provides an opportunity to become familiar with the type of ethical dilemmas commonly faced by junior officers. It highlights the point that although the Army is characterized by high ethical standards, confronting ethical dilemmas is an inevitable task for any leader. This class does not provide the "answers"; it merely helps the cadets understand what they may expect to be confronted with and provides them an opportunity to think certain situations through.

 

1-5: The Professional Military Ethic Ė Part I: To provide first class cadets with a solid understanding of professions and professional ethics so that they may examine the Professional Military Ethic in greater detail in subsequent lessons. It is primarily instructional in nature, delivered by the officers of the CHET.

 

1-6: The Professional Military Ethic Ė Part II: This class provides an opportunity for the cadets to discuss the information presented in 1-5. It is designed to both foster a greater understanding of the military as a profession and the sources of influence which shape the Professional Military Ethic. Cadets draw upon their educational experience across the West Point experience to frame the discussion topics of this lesson.

1-7: The Professional Military Ethic Ė Capstone: Cadets define, in their own terms, what the Professional Military Ethic is and how it applies to officers in the US Armed Forces. This class also provides closure to the four-year developmental experience of living an honorable life as a cadet at the Military Academy and provides a forum for CHET officers, NCOs, and DA civilians to advise the First Class cadets on their transition to honorable life as commissioned leaders of character.